June 26, 2015

Baguio Weekend

Celine, Gerardo, Mama Chelle and family, and I spent last weekend (June 20-21) in Baguio City. We arrived in the early morning of June 20 and went straight to Azalea Hotel to rest first.

We woke up early and went to the Centennial Building of University of Baguio (UB) for the Google I/O 2015 Extended Baguio (link). I talked about the new Android updates from I/O.

In the afternoon, we facilitated code labs in UB's computer laboratory. Gerardo was supposed to do the code lab about Google+ signin in Android and I was supposed to facilitate the App Indexing Code Lab but due to technical difficulties, I suggested he do a basic Android workshop and I will do an advanced code lab (Unit Testing). These didn't really work out because the Windows computers do not want to cooperate. We shared tips and answered some questions. I also shared about an upcoming inter-school Android app development competition.

After the event, we had dinner with the organizers and volunteers of GDG Baguio at 50s Diner (in ). Celine, Reymart, Mama Chelle, Gerardo, and I went to the night market before going back to the hotel.

The next day, we woke up early to go to the strawberry farm. We were able to do some strawberry picking. Afterwards, we went back to the hotel and rested. We then had lunch at Cafe by the Ruins before Celine and I went back to Manila.


June 24, 2015

Installing Android Studio

Android Studio is the official IDE for Android app development. It provides the core tools needed to start developing Android apps, including Android Studio IDE and the Android SDK tools.



You can download Android Studio at http://developer.android.com/sdk/index.html. Your machine should have JDK (Java SE Development Kit) 6 or higher. If you are developing for Android 5.0+, you would need JDK 7+. JDK can be downloaded here.

Setup on Windows

To set up Android Studio on Windows, launch the .exe file and follow the setup wizard to install Android Studio and any necessary SDK tools. If you already have a copy of the SDK, choose Custom Install in the Install Type. In the SDK components uncheck SDK. You will be prompted to provide the directory where the SDK is. To access the Android SDK tools from the command line, navigate to the location where they are installed, e.g. \Users\\sdk\

Note: If the launcher script does not find where Java is installed, you need to set an environment variable indicating the correct location. To do this, select Start menu > Computer > System Properties > Advanced System Properties. Then open Advanced tab > Environment Variables and add a new system variable JAVA_HOME that points to your JDK folder e.g. C:\Program Files\Java\jdk1.7.0_21.

Setup on Mac OS X

If you have a Mac OS X machine, launch the .dmg file and drag and drop Android Studio into the Applications folder. Open Android Studio and follow the setup wizard to install any necessary SDK tools. If you already have a copy of the SDK, choose Custom Install in the Install Type. In the SDK components uncheck SDK. You will be prompted to provide the directory where the SDK is. To access the Android SDK tools from the command line, navigate to /Users/Library/Android/sdk/

Note: If you see a warning when opening Android Studio that says the package is damaged and should be moved to the trash, go to System Preferences > Security & Privacy and under Allow applications downloaded from, select Anywhere. Then open Android Studio again.

Setup on Linux

On Linux, unpack the downloaded Android Studio ZIP file into your preferred location. To launch Android Studio, navigate to the android-studio/bin/ directory in a terminal and execute studio.sh. Follow the setup wizard to install the SDK and any necessary SDK tools. If you already have a copy of the SDK, choose Custom Install in the Install Type. In the SDK components uncheck SDK. You will be prompted to provide the directory where the SDK is.

Note: You may add android-studio/bin/ to your PATH environment variable so that you can start Android Studio from any directory. Note: You may also need to install the ia32-libs, lib32ncurses5-dev, and lib32stdc++6 packages to support 32-bit apps on a 64-bit machine.

Adding SDK Packages

After setting up Android Studio, you need to add SDK packages using the SDK Manager. To open the SDK Manager from Android Studio, select Tools > Android > SDK Manager or click SDK Manager () in the toolbar. On Windows, you can double-click the SDK Manager.exe file at the root of the Android SDK directory. On Mac or Linux, open a terminal and navigate to /tools directory, then execute android sdk 

Download the following packages from the SDK manager:
  • Tools
    • Android SDK Tools
    • Android SDK Platform-tools
    • Android SDK Build-tools (latest version)
  • The latest Android (Android X.X) folder
    • SDK Platform
    • A System image for creating emulators: ARM EABI v7a System Image or Intel x86 Atom System Image
    • Samples for SDK (optional)
    • Documentation (optional)
  • Extras
    • Android Support Repository
    • Android Support Library
    • Google Repository (if you will be using Google Play Services APIs)
    • Google Play services (if you will be using Google Play Services APIs)

You have now successfully installed Android Studio. It is now time to build awesome Android apps. If you are new to using Android Studio, you can check this DevByte video.


June 17, 2015

Android at Google I/O 2015

Google I/O 2015 was held on May 28-29 at Moscone West in San Francisco, California. There were a lot of Android announcements and updates during I/O. Here are some of the updates related to Android.

Android M

Android M is the newest version of Android. It aims to improve the core user experience of Android and has big changes to the fundamentals of the platform.



What's New in Android M

New features include App Permisssions, Doze, App Links, Fingerprint support, and more. For development, new updates include Android Design Support Library, Google Play Services 7.5 (Smart Lock for Passwords, App Invites, and more), Android Studio 1.3 with NDK and C/C++ support, Data Binding, Google Cloud Messaging 3.0, among others. Also announced were Cloud Test Lab, Android Pay, and Brillo and Weave. Brillo extends the Android platform to connected devices while Weave is the IOT protocol for everything.

Android M Developer Preview

Google also released Developer Preview of Android M for Nexus 5, 6, 9, and Player. You can download the system image at https://developer.android.com/preview and flash it to your device. There will be OTA updates for the preview before they launch the official version in the third quarter of the year.

If you want to start playing around with the new APIs of Android M, you should download Android M (API 22, MNC Preview) packages using your SDK manager and use Android Studio 1.3 (available in the Canary channel). You can also check out the API Overview and samples

When creating new projects, you should use MNC: Android M (Preview) as the mimimum SDK. For existing projects, you can update your build.gradle file with the following values:
compileSdkVersion:'android-MNC'
minSdkVersion:'MNC'
targetSdkVersion:'MNC'


Android Training

They also announced http://medium.com/google-developers, a collection of Medium Articles written by Google Developers. One of the things you should check out is the Developing for Android Article Series.

I/O Videos

In the keynote, there were a lot of Android announcements. The keynote is available for watching here. You can also watch videos of Android-related I/O sessions and 100 Days of Google Dev videos here.


Android @ #io15 YouTube Playlist